The Vegetarian’s Guide to Prague

By Bounce Staff:


Photo by Martin Krchnacek on Unsplash

The Czech capital of Prague is a fantastic place to visit. The beautifully preserved Old Town around Charles Square is a picture-perfect place to soak up the town's medieval atmosphere, while the brooding magnificence of Prague Castle is an ideal location to learn more about the rich history of this central European country.


But while Prague may be famous for its architecture and history, it's not as well known for its food. That's a shame, because Prague, and the Czech Republic as a whole, have a proud culinary tradition that makes the city a gastronomical delight. Plus, while Prague isn't the bargain for budget travelers it once was, it remains a very affordable place to visit by western European standards.


If you're vegan, vegetarian, or just trying to watch your meat intake, don't worry that you won't be able to find things to eat in Prague. The city has several distinctive dishes and eateries that are vegetarian friendly, and you'll be able to experience unique and interesting meals that are part of Czech history, as well as find the latest in fusion food and other mouthwatering options.


Drop off your bags at a Prague luggage storage and get ready to enjoy a meat-free culinary odyssey through the city. Here are a few you should check out:



Smažený sýr


This Czech classic is beloved by locals and visitors alike. It's basically fried cheese, and it comes in a variety of forms. The most common version is made with Edam cheese, but you can also find it made with other types of cheese like mozzarella or Emmental.


Smažený sýr is often served as an appetizer, but it can also be a main course. It's usually served with boiled potatoes, although some restaurants will substitute french fries or mashed potatoes. And while smažený sýr is usually fried in oil, some restaurants will use butter for a richer flavor.


There are a few places in Prague that are particularly well known for their versions of the dish. One is U Fleků, a massive brewery and restaurant that's been serving up food and beer to locals and visitors for centuries. Another popular spot is Lokál, which has several locations around the city.



Trdelník


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Trdelník is a type of chimney cake that's popular in Prague and other parts of central Europe. It's made by wrapping dough around a rod, then roasting it over an open fire. The result is a light and fluffy pastry that's often coated with sugar or cinnamon.


Trdelník can be served plain, or it can be filled with ice cream, fruit, or other sweet toppings. It's a popular snack food, and you'll see trdelník being sold all over Prague. If you want to try one, head to one of the many stands in Old Town Square or Můstek Metro Station.



Lángos


Originally a Hungarian dish, lángos has taken hold in the Czech capital in a big way. Lángos is a kind of red-sauce pizza made with paprika-infused tomato sauce. The sauce is spread on top of the pizza dough, then toppings are added.


Lángos is a popular choice for vegetarians, as the sauce and dough are usually vegan. The toppings can vary, but some of the most common include mushrooms, onions, peppers, and cheese. For some amazing lángos, head to Pizzerie Riva, which has several locations around Prague.



Šopský Salát


This dish is popular in the Czech Republic and other parts of central Europe. It's a salad made with cucumbers, tomatoes, feta cheese, and onion, and it's usually dressed with vinegar or oil. Šopský salát is a simple dish, but it's incredibly refreshing and flavorful. It's a great option if you're looking for something light to eat, and it goes well with almost any main course. You can find šopský salát on the menu at most Czech restaurants.



Bramboráky


These potato pancakes are a Czech classic, and they make a great vegetarian main course or side dish. Bramboráky are made with grated potatoes, onion, egg, and flour, and they're usually fried in oil or butter.


They're often served with sour cream or apple sauce, and they can be topped with cheese, vegetables, or other toppings. To try bramboráky yourself, there’s Čestr, a restaurant in Prague's Old Town specializing in Czech cuisine.



Guláš


This hearty stew is popular in central and eastern Europe, and it's a great choice for vegetarians. Guláš (sometimes more familiar as "goulash") is usually made with mushrooms, onions, peppers, and tomatoes, and it's often served with dumplings or bread.


For a traditional guláš experience, U Fleků, which has been serving the dish for centuries, has you covered. Or try Čestr, where the guláš is made with seitan (a type of wheat-based meat alternative).



Knedlíky


These steamed dumplings are a staple of Czech cuisine, and they make a great vegetarian main course or side dish. Knedlíky are made with flour, eggs, milk, and salt, and they're usually boiled in water or chicken stock, so make sure to clarify before consuming.


They can be served plain, or they can be topped with gravy, vegetables, or other toppings. For a taste of knedlíky, they are part of the traditional Czech cuisine served at U Fleků.



Palačinky


These thin pancakes are popular in the Czech Republic and other parts of central Europe. Palačinky are made with flour, milk, eggs, and sugar, and they're usually served with fruit, jam, or cheese.


They can also be made savory, and they're often filled with vegetables or meat. Head to Pankrác Metro Station, where there's a popular stand that sells palačinky.



Conclusion


Vegetarianism is becoming more popular all over the world, and Prague is no exception. Plenty of great restaurants cater to vegetarians, and there's a wide variety of dishes to choose from. So whether you're a vegetarian looking for some good options in Prague or you're just curious about vegetarian cuisine, be sure to check out some of these great dishes on your next visit!

Photo by Pavel S on Unsplash
 

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